nprhereandnow:

Episode 4C: A Young Public Health Professional In The Navajo Nation

In the Navajo Nation, the largest Indian reservation in the U.S., members of the tribe in their 20s are taking on leadership roles. Celena McCray, 27, has a degree in community health education from the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque.  She’s been working as the legislative district assistant to Jonathan Hale, one of 24 council delegates – the lawmakers of the Navajo Nation. He also chairs the Health, Education and Human Services Committee. 

Celena was laid off this week when the line item in the budget for legislative district assistant was vetoed. She plans to get her Master of Public Health (MPH) and continue working to help her people. 

“This is my roots, this is who I am and where I come from,” she said. “One of my main initiatives is really helping the youth… one of the areas I’m really interested in addressing is suicide prevention.”  

She’d like to see the Navajo Nation do more to address housing issues and take care of veterans. Another issue she sees is the lack of opportunity for young people who return to the Navajo Nation, after going to college.

“We have educated people who received their master’s, doctorates, you know they did so much – great credentials – but when they come back to the Nation, they get turned away, they get their job applications denied due to no experience,” she said. “That’s really hard, because you know I think these innovative, smart people who are encouraged to come back and help their people after receiving their education, they should have a place here. They should be able to have a chance to improve the Nation and move the Nation forward with their knowledge and skill, but that’s not happening.”

The Navajo language is a hot-button issue right now, as one of the two presidential candidates in the upcoming election is not fluent. There’s a question of whether that’s against Navajo law. But it’s common for people in Celena’s generation to not speak the language fluently. She wishes she could. 

“I came to question why my parents never taught me Navajo – because they’re full-blown fluent,” she said. Her parents explained, “‘we didn’t want you guys to have any troubles with academics’… but the funny part is today they do say they wish they taught us, and they came to understand why it’s so important.”

Celena says she’s proud to be Navajo, and she encourages people to learn about the Navajo Nation by visiting. 

“Being Navajo is a beautiful thing,” she said. “I think a lot of people should get a chance to just come out to the Nation – besides looking at our poverty levels and diabetes epidemic and so forth. I think they’ll really enjoy the beauty of being here, be surrounded by culture, really take a look at the landscape here, because the Nation is a very beautiful place. And then also the food - the food’s also a great thing.”

-Rachel

thinkmexican:

Women’s Collective in Mexico Works to Save Bee Species

A group of Indigenous women are challenging ancient social norms in order to preserve an endangered species: the stingless bee known as Melipona Beecheii. Traditionally the prerogative of men in Maya culture, beekeeping is providing this collective with a source of income and a reason to keep the species from going extinct.

Read more about these awesome women maintaing traditional knowledge while creating new businesses in Yucatán: Women Work to Save Native Bees of Mexico [Wired]

Video via Storyhunter

scrapes:

kingofhispaniola:

designbydiaspora:

blackaroundtheworld:

While the international community drags it’s feet on the Ebola crisis, #Cuba has sent 165 health professionals to Freetown Sierra Leone, the largest medical team of any other nation. 300 more #Cuban doctors and nurses will also go to Liberia and Guinea.
Although Cuba is far from a “wealthy” country, it’s universal health-care system allows them to export heath workers, 50K in 66 countries to be exact. Often responding to foreign health crises (like Katrina) at an extensive rate. #kudos #afrocuban

Beautiful

Cuba has some of the best doctors most people in the Caribbean go to Cuba to study medicine


my people!!!!!!

scrapes:

kingofhispaniola:

designbydiaspora:

blackaroundtheworld:

While the international community drags it’s feet on the Ebola crisis, #Cuba has sent 165 health professionals to Freetown Sierra Leone, the largest medical team of any other nation. 300 more #Cuban doctors and nurses will also go to Liberia and Guinea.

Although Cuba is far from a “wealthy” country, it’s universal health-care system allows them to export heath workers, 50K in 66 countries to be exact. Often responding to foreign health crises (like Katrina) at an extensive rate. #kudos #afrocuban

Beautiful

Cuba has some of the best doctors most people in the Caribbean go to Cuba to study medicine

my people!!!!!!

Reblogged from precious-knowledge

sixpenceee:

The spider catches the bee and the bee stings the spider. Both are dead, with the bee’s stinger still in the spider.  This is a great example showing why honey bees die after stinging something only once. Their stinger/venom sac are attached to other organs inside the bee, so when the stinger’s barbs lodge into something, everything gets pulled out, potentially including gut, etc and leaving a gaping hole in the bees abdomen. (From Here) 

sixpenceee:

The spider catches the bee and the bee stings the spider. Both are dead, with the bee’s stinger still in the spider.  This is a great example showing why honey bees die after stinging something only once. Their stinger/venom sac are attached to other organs inside the bee, so when the stinger’s barbs lodge into something, everything gets pulled out, potentially including gut, etc and leaving a gaping hole in the bees abdomen. (From Here) 

Reblogged from precious-knowledge

"Good Morning"
“How was your day?”
“Be careful”
“Text me when you get home so I know you’re safe”
“Sweet dreams”
“How are you?”
“I hope you’re feeling better”
“Have a good day today!”
“:)”
“I miss you”
“Good night”
“Can you come over?”
“Can I come over?”
“Can I see you?”
“Can I call you?”
“You’re beautiful”
“Want something to drink?”
“Watch your step”
“Let’s watch a movie”
“What are you up to?”
“How is your day so far?”
“It will be okay”
“I’m here for you”
“Do you need anything?”
“Are you hungry?”
“I just wanted to hear your voice”
“You just made my day”

You don’t have to hear “I Love You” to know that someone does. Listen carefully. People speak from the heart more often than you think.

Blocklava (via blocklava)

micdotcom:

Striking portraits redefine the stereotypes about Iranian fathers and daughters

Photographer Nafise Motlaq recently set out on a mission to prove that not all Iranian fathers are the same. 

Currently living in Malaysia, Motlaq grew tired of how her native Iran is frequently characterized. “After living far from my homeland for several years, I found that people generally have stereotyped opinions about Iran and Iranians due to what mainstream media feed them,” she told Mic. 

Following her own father’s bout with a serious illness and a visit home after several years abroad, she was inspired to shoot the “Fathers and Daughters” series.

Follow micdotcom

Reblogged from micdotcom